mattkirkland:

Citizen Science!  You can volunteer to transcribe labels in a natural history museum, all from the comfort of your own chair.  There’s a great set of insects, as well as birds and pressed plant specimens.
Of course I’m disproportionately fond of coleoptera, but I think this is worth spending free time on just to see the photos of the beetle specimens.
Hat tip to @chris_radcliff for the link.

mattkirkland:

Citizen Science!  You can volunteer to transcribe labels in a natural history museum, all from the comfort of your own chair.  There’s a great set of insects, as well as birds and pressed plant specimens.

Of course I’m disproportionately fond of coleoptera, but I think this is worth spending free time on just to see the photos of the beetle specimens.

Hat tip to @chris_radcliff for the link.

effyeahnerdfighters:

Flags and Helpers

In which John talks about the bombing at the Boston Marathon while he drives to the dentist.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

from Ben Hatke’s Robot Comic #27:


Hey, Little Robot found his transformation! Don’t grow up too fast Little Robot!


I just discovered Ben Hatke’s excellent Zita the Spacegirl books, and then found this. My heart! It’s all melted!

from Ben Hatke’s Robot Comic #27:

Hey, Little Robot found his transformation! Don’t grow up too fast Little Robot!

I just discovered Ben Hatke’s excellent Zita the Spacegirl books, and then found this. My heart! It’s all melted!

When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’ To this day, especially in times of ‘disaster,’ I remember my mother’s words, and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers—so many caring people in this world.

Fred Rogers

From the PBS page “Helping Children With Scary News”.

“Wool Mattresses Are the Best!”
(also from Deb. I’m glad she’s seeing the good side of sheep. :)

Wool Mattresses Are the Best!”

(also from Deb. I’m glad she’s seeing the good side of sheep. :)

It’s lamb season! (from Deb, a farmer in Napa, who can’t help but get tired of delivering and hand-feeding all these little guys)

It’s lamb season! (from Deb, a farmer in Napa, who can’t help but get tired of delivering and hand-feeding all these little guys)

mattkirkland:

This is what happens when a counterfeit jean factory has a bug in their label software.

Is it bad that I kinda want these?

mattkirkland:

This is what happens when a counterfeit jean factory has a bug in their label software.

Is it bad that I kinda want these?

Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions that list so-called measurable criteria likes years of experience and some arbitrary list of skills and competencies. Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives. For example, rather than “Must have 5-7 years of international accounting experience, a CPA, and an MBA,” say “Implement the SAP international consolidations module in six months.”

Advice from Lou Adler, from Bill Gates and is HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp? (via Brad)

This is an intriguing idea; rather than guessing at the experiences an applicant would need to do the job, you list the functional goals of the job itself. Each goal can be turned into a question (“Would you be able to do this part of the job in the time required?”), and the answer to that question is what you evaluate when hiring.

This actually sounds like evaluating a contractor. Experience and skills come up, of course, but not as a list of buzzwords and numbers to match. They’re the answer to the question, “Can you do this thing we need?”

A potential side effect – beneficial, in my opinion – is that a performance review can take the same form as the interview, with the same list of questions. “Did you do this thing we needed?”

Life comes down to who you love and who loves you back - government has no place in the middle.

Senator Mark Kirk, as reported by BBC News

Beautifully put.