mattkirkland:

This is what happens when a counterfeit jean factory has a bug in their label software.

Is it bad that I kinda want these?

mattkirkland:

This is what happens when a counterfeit jean factory has a bug in their label software.

Is it bad that I kinda want these?

Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions that list so-called measurable criteria likes years of experience and some arbitrary list of skills and competencies. Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives. For example, rather than “Must have 5-7 years of international accounting experience, a CPA, and an MBA,” say “Implement the SAP international consolidations module in six months.”

Advice from Lou Adler, from Bill Gates and is HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp? (via Brad)

This is an intriguing idea; rather than guessing at the experiences an applicant would need to do the job, you list the functional goals of the job itself. Each goal can be turned into a question (“Would you be able to do this part of the job in the time required?”), and the answer to that question is what you evaluate when hiring.

This actually sounds like evaluating a contractor. Experience and skills come up, of course, but not as a list of buzzwords and numbers to match. They’re the answer to the question, “Can you do this thing we need?”

A potential side effect – beneficial, in my opinion – is that a performance review can take the same form as the interview, with the same list of questions. “Did you do this thing we needed?”

Life comes down to who you love and who loves you back - government has no place in the middle.

Senator Mark Kirk, as reported by BBC News

Beautifully put.

measuredvoice:

Amtrak made a bold move today when it tried to cheer up a disgruntled passenger with some jokes on Twitter.
It’s great to see Amtrak make this kind of effort. Humor is hard to pull off, and it can backfire. What’s more, many major services like Amtrak may steer clear of social media precisely because of complaints like Raelynn’s. Countless factors beyond Amtrak’s control can cause train delays, so why open yourself up to complaints that you can’t respond to?
Amtrak’s jokes provide the answer. Customers are going to complain on Twitter if you’re there or not. An official presence on Twitter gives you a chance to let customers know that they’re heard and that you care about them, even if you can’t solve their problem. If a customer is having a bad experience, you have a chance to make it a little better by reaching out to them.
Now, your mileage may vary. Like I said, humor is hard to pull off. It’d be weird if Amtrak tried to tell train jokes to everyone who complains about them, but this was a good showing.

I’d add: Be a person. Not “be yourself” or “be like everyone on Twitter”, but write like your account is a human being, because that’s how other people see it.
What kind of person would @Amtrak be? I picture somebody’s dad, middle aged and middle class, kindly and patient, fine with wearing a silly hat because he loves trains.
When Raelynn got frustrated, how would that kindly person respond? Silence? No, he cares too much. Helpful advice? Normally yes, but he knows there’s no way to solve the problem right now. A joke to make her smile? Yes. A corny joke about trains? Absolutely.
To be clear: the actual person writing for @Amtrak could be an 18-year-old disaffected hipster or an 80-year-old foul-mouthed firebrand, but the voice of that imagined @Amtrak is what came through. That corny, friendly voice.

measuredvoice:

Amtrak made a bold move today when it tried to cheer up a disgruntled passenger with some jokes on Twitter.

It’s great to see Amtrak make this kind of effort. Humor is hard to pull off, and it can backfire. What’s more, many major services like Amtrak may steer clear of social media precisely because of complaints like Raelynn’s. Countless factors beyond Amtrak’s control can cause train delays, so why open yourself up to complaints that you can’t respond to?

Amtrak’s jokes provide the answer. Customers are going to complain on Twitter if you’re there or not. An official presence on Twitter gives you a chance to let customers know that they’re heard and that you care about them, even if you can’t solve their problem. If a customer is having a bad experience, you have a chance to make it a little better by reaching out to them.

Now, your mileage may vary. Like I said, humor is hard to pull off. It’d be weird if Amtrak tried to tell train jokes to everyone who complains about them, but this was a good showing.

I’d add: Be a person. Not “be yourself” or “be like everyone on Twitter”, but write like your account is a human being, because that’s how other people see it.

What kind of person would @Amtrak be? I picture somebody’s dad, middle aged and middle class, kindly and patient, fine with wearing a silly hat because he loves trains.

When Raelynn got frustrated, how would that kindly person respond? Silence? No, he cares too much. Helpful advice? Normally yes, but he knows there’s no way to solve the problem right now. A joke to make her smile? Yes. A corny joke about trains? Absolutely.

To be clear: the actual person writing for @Amtrak could be an 18-year-old disaffected hipster or an 80-year-old foul-mouthed firebrand, but the voice of that imagined @Amtrak is what came through. That corny, friendly voice.

jtotheizzoe:

Watch the slow creep of spring as it pushes the cold hand of winter back to the frigid north … only to succumb again next year, of course.
NASA’s MODIS imager senses Earth’s reflection of both visible and longer wavelength near-infrared light. Plants, full of chlorophyll, absorb most visible light (except for green, of course) and reflect near-infrared. By combining this with the reflection of snow, NASA can watch the yearly cycle of vegetation springing back and falling away.
I made a higher-res GIF here, and you can watch the full three-year animation here.

jtotheizzoe:

Watch the slow creep of spring as it pushes the cold hand of winter back to the frigid north … only to succumb again next year, of course.

NASA’s MODIS imager senses Earth’s reflection of both visible and longer wavelength near-infrared light. Plants, full of chlorophyll, absorb most visible light (except for green, of course) and reflect near-infrared. By combining this with the reflection of snow, NASA can watch the yearly cycle of vegetation springing back and falling away.

I made a higher-res GIF here, and you can watch the full three-year animation here.

Kim Jong Un takes vacation planning seriously.
(via North Korea Releases ‘Strike Plan’ Photos - Business Insider)
Really, though, why would anyone pick San Diego, Austin, Honolulu, and DC as their “strike” choices? A tourist jaunt seems much more likely to me.

Kim Jong Un takes vacation planning seriously.

(via North Korea Releases ‘Strike Plan’ Photos - Business Insider)

Really, though, why would anyone pick San Diego, Austin, Honolulu, and DC as their “strike” choices? A tourist jaunt seems much more likely to me.

I don’t know what “magnetic paste” is, but this GIF makes it seem terrifying.
From @ProteinWrangler on Twitter.

I don’t know what “magnetic paste” is, but this GIF makes it seem terrifying.

From @ProteinWrangler on Twitter.

SpaceX Dragon splashes down
(from @SpaceX on Twitter)

SpaceX Dragon splashes down

(from @SpaceX on Twitter)